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Live Science podcast ‘Life’s Little Mysteries’ special report: Coronavirus (Aug. 13) – Live Science

Find out the latest news about the new coronavirus and COVID-19.

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‘Fireball’ meteorite that fell to Earth in 2018 reveals its secrets – CNN

A meteorite that fell to Earth in January 2018 is covered in more than 2,600 organic compounds, according to new research. Meteorites likely delivered the building…

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(CNN)A 12-million-year-old meteorite that fell to Earth in January 2018 is covered in more than 2,600 organic compounds, according to new research. Meteorites such as this one likely acted as messengers early in Earth’s history, delivering the building blocks of life, the researchers said.
A fireball meteor was seen streaking across the sky over the Midwest and Ontario on the evening of January 16, 2018. Weather data helped scientists quickly track where the pieces of the meteor fell to Earth so…

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Rare blue moon will appear over Lancashire on Halloween – the best time to seen it – Lancs Live

The phenomenon could offer something special for families and kids with Lancashire under Tier 3 lockdown restrictions

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Stargazing fans in Lancashire will be in for a treat this Halloween with a rare blue moon set to appear.
The phenomenon will appear this Saturday (October 31) and you won’t want to miss it as it won’t happen again until at least August 2023.
Due to Lancashire being in Tier 3 lockdown measures, this year’s Halloween celebrations are set to be a very different affair with traditional activities like trick or treating and parties off the cards.
However the timely spooky lunar event could offer something…

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Video: Using dragonflies to measure mercury pollution – Phys.org

A citizen science program that began over a decade ago found that dragonflies can be used to measure mercury pollution. Research Professor Celia Chen, director…

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A citizen science program that began over a decade ago found that dragonflies can be used to measure mercury pollution. Research Professor Celia Chen, director of Dartmouth’s Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, explains the national research effort, which grew out of a Dartmouth-affiliated regional project to collect dragonfly larvae.
“It’s an important possible way for us to determine whether national and international policies on controlling mercury are effective,” says Chen. “The dragonfly…

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