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She Doesn’t Make Animals Cry, but She Collects Their Tears – The New York Times

By studying the numerous ways animals keep their eyes wet and healthy, scientists hope to help address human vision problems.

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By and large, though, the chemical recipe for tears, which include a slurry of water, fats, proteins and charged minerals such as sodium, seems to be pretty similar across various species. The few variations that exist seem to track with habitat, the researchers found. Animals that spent most of their time on land, for instance, had more proteins in their tears than their seafaring counterparts, but they also had less urea a molecular waste product thats also found in urine.
Dr. Oriás team also…

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Another look at possible under-ice lakes on Mars: They’re still there – Ars Technica

It can be tough to spot water under an ice cap from orbit.

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In recent decades, we’ve become aware of lots of water on Earth that’s deep under ice. In some cases, we’ve watched this water nervously, as it’s deep underneath ice sheets, where it could lubricate the sheets’ slide into the sea. But we’ve also discovered lakes that have been trapped under ice near the poles, possibly for millions of years, raising the prospect that they could harbor ancient ecosystems.
Now, researchers are applying some of the same techniques…

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NASA Is Shooting Skincare Ads in Space – Highsnobiety

Estée Lauder is having a campaign for one of its products shot by NASA on the International Space Station. Find out how here.

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Estée Lauder is taking its new ad campaign to another planet. The cosmetics company has enlisted NASA to photograph one of its products for an otherworldly promo.
According to ABC News, Estée Lauder is doling out $17,500 an hour to have pictures and video of its Advanced Night Repair serum captured in space. The imagery taken in the most photographed spot on the International Space Station, the Cupola will then be used in a marketing campaign that is to be shared across social media.
The night…

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Sentinels of Ocean Acidification Impacts Survived Earth’s Last Mass Extinction – HeritageDaily

Two groups of tiny, delicate marine organisms, sea butterflies and sea angels, were found to be surprisingly resilient-having survived dramatic global climate change and Earth’s most recent mass extinction event 66 million years ago. – HeritageDaily – Archaeo…

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Two groups of tiny, delicate marine organisms, sea butterflies and sea angels, were found to be surprisingly resilient–having survived dramatic global climate change and Earth’s most recent mass extinction event 66 million years ago.
Sea butterflies and sea angels are pteropods, abundant, floating snails that spend their entire lives in the open ocean. A remarkable example of adaptation to life in the open ocean, these mesmerizing animals can have thin shells and a snail foot transformed into t…

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